Calendario

Septiembre 2018
LunMarMierJueVierSabDom
 << < > >>
     12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Anuncio

¿Quién está en línea?

Miembro: 0
Visitante: 1

rss Sindicación

Jul232015

Technology - InfoBarrel

© Copyright 2008 - 2015 by Hinzie Media Inc.

Terms of Service

Privacy Policy

XML Sitemap

Page built in 0.6891s







Globals defined (0): 0.0002s

Int Includes (0): 0.0010s

Ext Includes (0): 0.0015s

User load (0): 0.0015s

article: 0.0163s

article loaded: 0.0198s

HeaderS (8): 0.0199s

HeaderE (8): 0.0199s

New Articles (35): 0.3291s

ArticlesPrint (53): 0.3943s

Features (73): 0.5197s

FeaturesPrint (77): 0.5244s

DB Connections: 87








Admin · 35 vistas · Escribir un comentario
Jul232015

Promoting the use of online social technology as a case-based learning tool.

1. INTRODUCTION

An increasing number of educators are considering the use of social

media as a pedagogical tool because of its popularity among college

students. However, most of these educators are still uncertain as to how

to integrate this technology into the management curriculum in order to

help students improve their understanding of business cases (Khadijah,

Rahman, and MohdNasir, 2011). Online social technology is embedded with

four primary technical features: sharing, grouping, conversation, and

relationships (Hu and Gollin, 2010). These features correspond with four

essential elements of case-based learning, which are sharing knowledge,

learning in groups, constantly exchanging information with other group

members, and building constructive relationships (Chen, Chen, and

Kinshuk, 2009). If used properly, social technology could be an

effective tool to help students acquire skills in analytical and

diagnostic thinking, develop strong persuasive skills, and make

decisions under conditions of uncertainty (Hackney, McMaster, and

Harris, 2003; Lee et al., 2009). Educators can also benefit by using

social technology to reach more case-based learners. In order to realize

the potential of using social technology, educators and administrators

need to first promote its use for case-based learning. In the meantime,

they need to assess the efficacy of this technology in case-based

learning applications.

The primary purposes of this preliminary study are to (1)

understand users' perceived usefulness of social technology for

case-based learning and (2) assess the potential impact of it on

users' case-based learning performance. Goodhue and Thompson (1995)

suggest that information technology is more likely to have a positive

impact on users' performance and usage if the capabilities of the

information technology match the tasks that the users must carry out.

Therefore, this study will adopt the task-technology fit perspective to

examine how these four technical features, sharing, grouping,

conversation, and relationships, would contribute to the use of social

technology for case-based learning. The aim of this study is to

determine if online social technology is a good fit as an online

learning technology for business students to acquire case-based learning

skills and knowledge.

Section 2 will first examine literature related to these four

technical features or constructs, and pose specific research questions

on their potential influence on the use of social technology for

case-based learning. Section 3 will discuss the experimental setting,

data collection procedure, and data analysis methods. Section 4 will

present the results from the data analysis to answer the proposed

research questions. The remaining sections will present study

limitations and proposed future research, as well as scholarly and

practical implications.

2. LITERATURE REVIEW

2.1 Social Capital and Case-Based Learning

Social capital is the actual and virtual resources accumulated via

the social networks or relationships among people (Coleman, 1988). The

more social capital that is available in an online community, the more

the members will contribute to it. Because social capital is a cause and

effect phenomena (Williams, 2006), the increase of it relies on the

mutual support among the members to produce positive social outcomes

(e.g. trust, shared information, self-esteem) (Adler and Kwon, 2002).

Although social capital underpins the success of online social networks,

developing it effectively remains a challenge for many online

communities.

Social capital cultivation is particularly important for the

success of case-based learning, an important element of management

education. In a face-to-face environment, students have plenty of

opportunities to interact with each other, with their team members,

guest speakers, and their instructor. Before each class discussion,

students need to study the facts related to the particular business

case, and define the problems faced by the different/various

stakeholders involved in it. Intensive discussions can help expose each

student to diverse ideas and provide the brainstorming process with new

and useful ideas to solve business problems. The instructor often plays

a facilitating role by having students or student teams play the

protagonist role and by leading constructive discussions on readily

solving business problems. All these opportunities available in the

traditional setting can help develop social capital in the classroom and

enhance the effectiveness of management education.

2.2 The Perceived Usefulness of the Relationship-Building Feature

of Social Technology by Case-Based Learners

Case-based learning is a widely accepted pedagogy in business

schools. For it to be successful in a classroom learners need to be able

to communicate, converse, and exchange their ideas in order to solve

business problems effectively. Although there are various types of

learning/course management systems such as Blackboard and Moodle that

have different features to enhance the learning process and increase

students' collaboration, most of these tools are still lacking the

social networking features that allow their users to freely communicate

and collaborate in a socially constructed manner (DeSchryver, et al.,

2009). Thus, the use of an online social technology site to build,

promote, and foster the relationship amongst users could be very useful

for case-based learning in a classroom (Voigt and MacFarlane, 2010).

Online social technology can enhance networking between students

who are working in an online group as well as foster relationships

amongst them since they are working together for the same common goal.

In addition, it may be an effective medium to help deliver quality

case-based instruction because it inherently supports social

interactions (Khadijah et al., 2011). Bandura (1977) suggests that

social interactions could be essential to the social learning process

because students learn from each other via observation, imitation, and

modelling. Thus, the available features of online social technology have

the potential to improve social interactions both inside and outside the

classroom. Therefore, the following question is proposed:

Question 1: Do case-based learners consider online social

technology an appropriate case-based learning tool because of its

relationship-building feature?

2.3 The Perceived Usefulness of the Sharing Feature of Social

Technology by Case-Based Learners

Edmodo is a web-based online social technology site, which allows

students and instructors to post materials, share links and videos, and

access class assignments, grades, and notices. Instructors and students

can also store and share digital content such as links, pictures, video,

documents, and PowerPoint presentations on it. Although the features

available to Edmodo's users are akin to other various Learning

Management Software (LMS) and Course Management Systems (CMS), the

Edmodo interface and features, such as tagging and sharing information

within selective groups, represent some of the unique social networking

aspects of the site. The emergence of online social technology provides

great opportunities to enrich case-based learning because it enables

more learners to exchange information and share knowledge at any time

and from any place (Buendia-Garcia et al., 2004). The process of

learning through information and knowledge exchanges could lead to an

increase in social capital within the online community (Rambe, 2011). As

the social capital accumulates, more users will perceive online social

technology as an appropriate technology to use and improve their

understanding of business cases. Therefore, the following research

question is proposed:

Question 2: Do case-based learners consider online social

technology an appropriate case-based learning tool because of its

sharing feature?

2.4 The Perceived Usefulness of the Grouping Feature of Social

Technology by Case-Based Learners

The flexibility of learning within the group context can expose

students to more diverse viewpoints, ideas, and opinions. If managed

properly, more, newer, and better ideas shared by group members can lead

to better solutions to resolve the business problems related to the

business case (Koo, Wati and Jung, 2011). However, in order to utilize

online social technology as an effective case-based learning tool, an

instructor needs to remove some of the barriers to its implementation.

One barrier is the absence of existing social capital in a newly

established class. This barrier can result in a lack of group cohesion.

One way to remove the barrier is to have the instructor ask each group

member to post an introduction on the group page. Also, information

about a student's behaviour and contributions (e.g., the number of

posts, posting frequency, comments, and feedback) to each online group

discussion can be recorded and tracked over time (Brady, Holcomb, and

Smith, 2010). With online social technology, students can use different

features such as the Community Support features where students can seek

advice from other students who are not from the same group. Also,

students can use project management features such as Calendar to set up

appointments to collaborate online with other groups. Thus, group

members can use the information shared by others to help them

distinguish good ideas from bad ones. Therefore, our third question is

proposed:

Question 3: Do case-based learners consider online social

technology an appropriate case-based learning tool because of its

grouping feature?

2.5 The Perceived Usefulness for the Conversational Feature of

Social Technology by Case-Based Learners

Students are motivated to engage in online discussion not only to



learn more about business cases and related business concepts, but also

to earn a good grade (Su et al., 2005). A poorly designed grading rubric

may create confusion amongst students and thus discourage them from

participating in case-based learning. A fair assessment of contributions

(e.g., the number of posts and information quality of each post) can

help the average students avoid feeling intimidated and overwhelmed by

more active discussants. An instructor may also have difficulty in

providing a prompt personal response to every comment posted by

students. Some students may feel isolated and ignored when their

questions are disregarded or responded to late. Despite these

challenges, online social technology enables students to share ideas,

work in groups, converse with each other, and build relationships

(Falloon, 2011). These characteristics indicate that the online social

technology's group discussion feature is potentially a fit tool for

case-based learning. Students can use this feature to discuss various

topics as well as to get personal responses from their instructor, and

their fellow students. This leads to the following question:

Question 4: Do case-based learners consider online social

technology an appropriate case-based learning tool because of its

conversational feature?

2.6 Improving Individual Learning Performance in Case-Based

Learning via Online Social Technology

Information technology is more likely to have a positive impact on

individual job performance and be utilized if its capabilities match the

tasks that the user must perform/carry out. Task-technology fit (TTF)

measures are strong predictors of individual (Goodhue et al., 1995) and

group (Zigurs et al., 1999) job performance and information technology

(IT) utilization.

Transfer of learning is the study of whether an individual is able

to transfer learning from one context to another that has similar

characteristics (Thorndike and Woodworth, 1901). Knowledge transfer is

successful if the learner can use the acquired knowledge to solve

routine and novel problems (Perkins and Salomon, 1992). Student

projects, such as case reports, require that each team in a class

propose different solutions to resolve practical problems. To properly

assess the range of content knowledge learned by students, they need to

answer not only simple questions (e.g., facts about the case and major

problems), but also sophisticated ones (e.g., suggest solutions as a

protagonist). Simple questions help assess the reading comprehension of

students, whereas challenging questions assess skills such as research

and critical analysis. Similar responses among student groups are often

expected to simple questions. On the contrary, it is normal to receive

completely different answers to complicated questions. Thus, we posit

that by increasing learners' perceived TTF they are more likely to

improve their performance in case-based learning. This leads to the

following question:

Question 5: Do case-based learners improve their learning

performance if they consider the use of social technology for case-based

learning useful?

3. METHODS

3.1 Participants and Setting

A field experiment was conducted because of its ability to gain

insights into the effectiveness of instructional methods (Asher, 1976).

The exploratory nature of the study required that the variables (e.g.,

interaction modes and usage patterns) under investigation be carefully

observed and interpreted. The setting for the field experiment was four

introduction to Management Information Systems classes offered by a

public university in Thailand. A total of 116 students in the

university's College of Business were invited to spend 14 days

reading and discussing the Harvard business case "Apple Inc."

on the social site Edmodo (http://www.Edmodo.com). Edmodo is an online

social technology site, which allows the instructor to control course

materials, learning content, and evaluation criteria to the same extent

in all four classes. A professional translator was used to translate the

English materials into Thai. The instructor covered/expounded the four

learning phases to all participants in these four classes. The

participants were introduced and the nature of the study was explained.

The four learning phases were: (1) introduction of Edmodo and

case-related concepts, (2) student case analysis, (3) output generation



and discussions, and (4) follow-up and evaluation. A survey was

conducted to understand the influence of social and affective factors on

subjects' intention to use the online social technology as a

case-based learning tool. For output generation and discussions, we

monitored the usage behaviour (e.g., the number of messages posted,

comments and responses, and the frequency of access) on Edmodo and

assessed how the subjects utilized the technology on the given tasks.

For follow-up and evaluation the students took a quiz with open-ended

questions that was graded based on the teaching guidelines provided

by/in the case manual.

4. DATA ANALYSIS

4.1 Demographics

The demographic profiles are presented in Table 1. In total, we

collected 116 surveys from the respondents. Although all students in

this study had some experience using Edmodo, they had not used it as a

case-based learning tool. Therefore, prior experience had little impact



on the users' learning performance and perceived usefulness of

case-based learning.

4.2 Reliability of Survey Instrument

Our survey instrument (see Appendix 1) uses a 5-point frequency

scale. Five choices were adopted for the questions used to measure the

usage frequency of social media for case-based learning (1

"never", 2 "once or twice", 3 "seldom", 4

"regularly", 5 "frequently"). For other questions

the Likert scale was as follows: 1 "strongly disagree", 2

"disagree", 3 "neutral", 4 "agree", 5

"strongly agree." Reliability was evaluated by assessing the

internal consistency of the scale constructs using Cronbach's alpha

coefficient. An alpha value of more than 0.6 is acceptable. Table 2

summarizes the reliability test results. As shown in Table 2, the

reliability for all constructs, other than the sharing construct,

demonstrates a satisfactory level of internal consistency (Malhotra,

2007).



4.3 Analysis Results

A series of regression analyses were used to examine the

relationship between predictors (independent variables) and outcomes

(dependent variables). Table 3 contains the regression analysis results

for the potential influence of independent variables on dependent

variables. The technological characteristics, Relationship-building

([beta]=0.358, p=0.00<0.01), Sharing ([beta]=0.226, p=0.00<0.01),

Grouping ([beta]=0.248, p=0.00<0.01), and Conversation ([beta]=0.325,

p=0.00<0.01), were found to be positively related to the users'

perceived task-technology fit or perceived usefulness of these technical

features for case-based learning. These findings indicate that the

subjects did perceive the usefulness of social technology for case-based

learning because of its four technical features.

Table 4 shows that the users' perceived usefulness for the use

of social technology in case-based learning was found positively related

to performance impact ([beta]=0.354, [beta]=0.00<0.01). The results

also confirm that when users consider the use of social technology for

case-based learning useful they tend to show improved learning

performance (Question 5). Table 5 summarizes analysis results for our

proposed research questions.

5. DISCUSSION

Effective use of online social technology to support case-based

learning relies on the cultivation of social factors, such as sharing,

grouping, conversation, and relationships in an online community (Hu et

al., 2010). Subjects in this study reported that the presence of these

social factors could lead to increased users' perceived usefulness

in case-based learning, thereby improving individual learning

performance. A student commented, "I really like the subgroup

feature in Edmodo. I was able form mini-groups and share files and

discuss the case with my group members". Another student also

commented, "I wish I could use Edmodo in my marketing class, I like

being able to exchange ideas with my group online. I especially like the

tag feature where I can share files and URL links with my group".

This finding affirms the importance of social factors in delivering

effective e-learning programs in addition to the presence of technical

factors (Wu and Hwang, 2010). A closer examination of the four social

factors shows that relationship-building has the largest impact on a

learner's perceived task-technology fit, followed by conversation,

grouping, and sharing features. This finding indicates that all of these

four essential elements are inherent in online social technology. Their

presence can help enhance learners' perceived task-technology fit.

Groups of five students were asked to study business cases via online

social technology. To encourage them to spend time and effort in using

online social technology, a business case and related course materials

were posted on the Library page for students to access. The students

reported that the Library was an important feature to initiate the

learning process. During this time, they frequently shared notes and

assignments with each other. These two features helped them exchange and

share knowledge to effectively acquire IT concepts and apply them to

solve practical problems related to the business case. Student attitude

is a stronger predictor for the use of online social technology than

perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and subjective norms in the

higher education context (Shittu et al., 2011). This study shows that

subjects who have a high perception of the usefulness of online social

technology in learning business cases can improve their learning

performance. This finding corroborates Cane and McCarthy's (2009)

previous study demonstrating the importance of increasing the degree of

fit between task requirements and technological features in order to

increase performance impact.

6. LIMITATIONS AND FUTURE RESEARCH

Although this preliminary study provides insights into the

potential usefulness of social technology for case-based learning, it

has a few limitations that need to be addressed for any large-scale

study in the future. One of the limitations was the limited/restricted

sample size and the time-constraint of only having two weeks for the



students to participate in this experiment. A longitudinal study (a

semester-long course design) may need to be set up in order to better

assess the influence of social factors on students' TTF for the use

of online social technology for case-based learning, thereby advancing

their understanding of business cases. Another limitation is the lack of

comparison to a student's performance. A future study could compare

the use of social technology with the student's performance as

well. A Harvard business case on Apple Inc. was adopted and translated

into Thai for students to improve their comprehension. Future research

may be able to use this as a surrogate/substitute to measure the

efficacy of case-based learning via social technology.

We asked students to self-report their usage of online social

technology in a survey. The current version of Edmodo still lacks the

ability to track the actual use of the online social technology.

Therefore, the real time online social technology usage was not

monitored to reflect its actual use. Students also voiced their

preference in using Facebook as a learning tool since they were more

familiar with the technology. Using the survey data as a surrogate might

not accurately detect the relationship between TTF and online social

technology usage. In addition, future research may want to consider

adopting the actual data to better assess the relationship.

7. THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL

IMPLICATIONS

This study makes two major contributions to the current TTF theory.

First, we investigated the applicability of the TTF theory to the

understanding of the use of online social technology in learning

business cases related to IT concepts. Second, four social factors,

sharing, relationship-building, conversation, and grouping, were used as

online social technological characteristics and antecedents for the TTF

measure. The findings of this study suggest that the TTF theory can be

used to help better understand not only user behaviour but also the

usefulness of online social technology as a case-based learning tool.

8. CONCLUSION

College students are embracing online social technology in their

daily life. However, adopting the technology as a pedagogical tool,

particularly in learning business cases, is still at the early adoption

phase. This preliminary study investigated the potential use of online

social technology to help students learn business cases related to

information technology from the task-technology fit perspective. Our

findings suggest that online social technology can be used as a fit

learning tool to improve students' understanding of business cases.

In addition, case-based learners can attain improved performance by

incorporating social technology into their learning process. An

instructor may want to exploit other creative pedagogical strategies by

incorporating social factors into the online learning community to not

only enhance student learning but also increase the actual use of online

social technology in learning business cases.

9. REFERENCES

Adler, P. S. & Kwon, S. (2002). Social Capital: Prospects for a

New Concept. The Academy of Management Review, 27(1), 17-40.

Asher, J. W. (1976). Educational research and evaluation methods.

Boston: Little, Brown.

Bandura, A. (1997). Self-efficacy: Toward a Unifying Theory of

Behavioral Change. Psychological Review, 84(2), 191-215.

Brady, K. P., Holcomb, L. B., & Smith, B. V. (2010). The use of

alternative social networking sites in higher educational settings: A

case study of the e-Learning benefits of E-Learning in education.

Journal of Interactive Online Learning, 9(2), 151-170.

Buendia-Garcia, F., Agusti, F., Benlloch, J. V., Bisbal, E. &

Lluesma, M. (2004). XEDU, A proposal of learning management system

implementation. Journal of Information Technology Impact, 4(1), 1-12.

Cane, S. & McCarthy, R. (2009). Analysing the Factors that

Affect Information Systems Use: A Task-Technology Fit Meta-Analysis.

Journal of Computer Information Systems, 50(1), 108-123.

Chen, I. Y. L., Chen, N.-S., & Kinshuk (2009). Examining the

factors influencing participants' knowledge sharing behavior in

virtual learning communities. Educational Technology & Society,

12(1), 134-148.



Coleman, J. S., (1988). Social capital in the creation of human

capital. The American. Journal of Sociology, 94, 95-120.

DeSchryver, M., Mishra, P., Koehleer, M. & Francis, A. (2009).

Moodle vs. Facebook: Does using Facebook for Discussions in an Online

Course Enhance Perceived Social Presence and Student Interaction?

Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher

Education International Conference, Charleston, SC, 329-336.

Falloon, G. (2011). Exploring the Virtual Classroom: What Students

Need to Know (and Teachers Should Consider). Journal of Online Learning

and Teaching, 7(4), 439-451.

Goodhue, D.L. & Thompson, R.L. (1995). Task-Technology Fit and

Individual Performance, MIS Quarterly, 19(2), 213-236.

Hackney, R., McMaster, T., & Harris, A. (2003). Using cases as

a teaching tool in IS Education. Journal of Information Systems

Education, 14(3), 229-234.

Hu, B. & Gollin, K. (2010). Supporting Case-Based Learning

Through a Collaborative Authoring System. Technologies and Practices for

Constructing Knowledge in Online Environments: Advancements in Learning,

14. 99-112.

Khadijah, A., Rahman, S., & MohdNasir, I. (2011). The

Effectiveness of Learning Management System (LMS) Case Study at Open

University Malaysia (OUM), Kota Bharu Campus. Journal of Emerging Trends

in Computing and Information Sciences, 2(2), 73-79.

Koo, C., Wati, Y., & Jung, J.J. (2011). Examination of How

Social Aspects Moderate the Relationship between Task Characteristics

and Usage of Social Communication Technologies (SCTs) in Organizations.

International Journal of Information Management, 31(5), 445-459.

Lee, S.-H., Lee, J., Liu, X., Bonk, C. J., & Magjuka, R. J.

(2009). A review of case-based learning practices in an online MBA

program: A program-level case study. Educational Technology &

Society, 12(3), 178-190.

Malhotra, N. K. (2007). Marketing Research: An Applied Orientation.

(5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.

Perkins, D.N. & Salomon, G. (1992). Transfer of learning:

contribution to the International Encyclopedia of Education. (2nd ed.).

England: Pergamon Press.

Rambe, P. (2011). Exploring the impacts of social networking sites

on academic relations in the university. Journal of Information

Technology Education, 10, 271293.

Shittu, A.T., Basha, K.M., AbdulRahman, N.S.N. & Ahmad, T.B.T.

(2011). Investigating Students' Attitude and Intention to Use

Social Software in Higher Institution of Learning in Malaysia.

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, 5(3), 194-208.

Su, B., Bonk, C. J., Magjuka, R. J., Liu, X., & Lee, S. (2005).

The importance of interaction in web-based education: A program-level

case study of online mba courses. The Journal of Interactive Online

Learning, 4(1), 1-19.

Thorndike, E.L. & Woodworth, R.S. (1901). The influence of

improvement in one mental function upon the efficiency of other

functions. Psychological Review, 8, 247-261.

Voigt, C. & MacFarlane, K. (2010). The Affective Domain and

Social Networking: Definitorial Issues and Misleading Assumptions.

Workshop: 5th EC-TEL. Barcelona, Spain.

Williams, D. (2006). On and off the 'net: Scales for social

capital in an online era. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication,

11(2), 593-628.

Wu, W. & Hwang, L. (2010). The effectiveness of e-learning for

blended courses in colleges: A multi-level empirical study.

International Journal of Electronic Business Management, 8(4), 312-322.

Zigurs, I., Buckland, B., Connolly, J., & Wilson, E.V. (1999).

A test of task-technology fit theory for group support systems. Data

Base for Advances in Information Systems, 30(3-4), 34-50.

Peter Ractham

Department of Management Information System

Thammasat Business School

Bangkok, 10200, Thailand

[email protected]

Charlie Chen

Walker College of Business

Appalachian State University

North Carolina, 28607, USA

[email protected]

Peter Ractham is a faculty member in the Department of Management

Information System at Faculty of Commerce and Accountancy, Thammasat

University, Thailand. He received his PhD in Information System and

Technology from Claremont Graduate University. His research interests

are Enterprise 2.0, Knowledge Management, E-Learning, and Health

Informatics.

Charlie C. Chen is an associate professor in the Department of

Computer Information Systems at Appalachian State University. He has

authored more than 50 referred articles and proceedings, presented at

many professional conferences and venues. Dr Chen has published in

journals such as Communications of Association for Information Systems,

Behaviour and Information Technology, Journal of Knowledge Management.



Table 1: Demographic Profile



Features Numbers Percent



Gender



Male 41 35.34%

Female 75 64.66%



Major



Accounting 71 55.04%

Management Information 0 0%

System

Marketing 19 14.73%

Finance 36 27.91%

International Business, 3 2.33%

Logistics and

Transportation

Human Resources 0 0%

Real Estate 0 0%

Operation Management 0 0%



Experience in using online Social Networking Sites

such as Facebook, Hi5, Twitter, YouTube



Less than 1 year 5 4.31%

1 to 2 years 32 27.59%

2 to 3 years 30 25.86%

3 to 4 years 15 12.93%

4 to 5 years 17 14.66%

More than 5 years 17 14.66%



Experience in using Edmodo



Less than 1 year 116 100%



Experience in using Edmodo as a case-based

learning tool



YES 116 0%



Experience in uploading photos on Edmodo



YES 110 95.6%

NO 5 4.4%



Table 2: Reliability of the Model Constructs



Constructs Cronbach's alpha

coefficient



Sharing 0.640

Grouping 0.946

Conversation 0.849

Relationship 0.944

Perceived Task-Technology Fit 0.909

Perceived Performance Impact 0.866

Utilization 0.799



Table 3: The Influence of Factors on the Perceived



Standardized

Coefficients

Independent Variable Beta t Sig. *



Constant 15.4 0.878



Sharing Feature .226 2.314 0.000

Grouping Feature .248 1.272 0.000

Conversational Feature .325 1.629 0.000



Relationship-building .358 1.687 0.000

Feature



* p < 0.05, [R.sup.2] = 0.471



Dependent Variable: Perceived Task-Technology Fit



Table 4: The Influence of Factors on the Performance Impact

of Edmodo



Standardized

Independent Coefficients

Variable Beta t Sig. *



Constant 0.083 0.934



Perceived Task- 0.354 4.026 0.000 *

Technology Fit



* p < 0.05, [R.sup.2] = 0.125



Dependent Variable: Performance Impact



Table 5: Summary of Answers to Research



Question Answer



Question 1: Do case-based learners consider online social YES

technology an appropriate case-based learning tool because

of its relationship-building feature?



Question 2: Do case-based learners consider online social YES

technology an appropriate case-based learning tool because

of its sharing feature?



Question 3: Do case-based learners consider online social YES

technology an appropriate case-based learning tool because

of its grouping feature?



Question 4: Do case-based learners consider online social YES

technology an appropriate case-based learning tool because

of its conversational feature?



Question 5: Do case-based learners improve their learning YES

performance if they consider the use of social technology

for case-based learning useful?


Admin · 29 vistas · Escribir un comentario
Jul232015

Benefits of Using Whole Body Vibration Machine

Benefits of Using Whole Body Vibration Machine - Improve Health and Fitness

 by: Eva Edwords



There is a lot of vibration exercise equipment available in the market that aim to help you in reducing your weight and related health issues. You may be able to lose your weight in less time and with less effort with the help of the latest weight loss tools. The most common and useful tool targeting weight loss purpose is using a vibration machine. It is one of the most effective weight loss tools and it takes just 10-15 minutes a day. You can buy this machine for your home gym without the need to go to a gym or health care center. You will be able to exercise with all the comforts of home and suit your schedule. It is also known as home based equipment.



No more commute or waiting at the gym for you turn to use the exercise equipment. By having your own equipment at home you are be able to take the advantage of this exercise machine any time you want. Many sports team, individuals and fitness centers use this machine. The vibration machine has vibration plates that help to oscillate the mechanical energy to the whole body of an individual. People can do static or dynamic movements on this vibration platform such as standing poses like squats, upper body like pushups and sitting poses for massage applications. Add dynamic motion exercises once technique has developed. Exercising on the vibration machine will burn the fat in a very short period and as your muscle mass becomes leaner, this will help accelerate weight loss. Many of the gyms and fitness industry gurus have this equipment because of its advantages. This exercise will result in the area of muscle health, hormone health, lymphatic health, bone strength and weight loss etc...







As there is a lot of health equipment available in the market it might be tough for you to choose the best one for you. Here are some points that will help you in your selection of exercise equipment that suits your body makeover most.

Before purchasing make it sure that the exercise machine is made with high-quality steel working parts.

Always buy a machine that belongs to a reputable company you can get information about the manufacturer through Customer Testimonials.

Check the warranty of the machine so that it sure you are covered against any type of damaged and defective machine.



Before undergoing any exercise plan or using any exercise equipment you should consult with your family doctor. These days many of the exercise machines are coming with an Instructional CD's and DVDs. By following this DVD you will be able to understand the machine more and how to maximize your efforts and results. Helping you achieve your goals.


Admin · 44 vistas · Escribir un comentario
Jul232015

Sysomos Acquires Social Marketing Service Expion





Sysomos, the social analytics company that recently split from its former acquirer Marketwire, today announced that it has acquired Expion, an enterprise social marketing platform that counts the likes of CocaCola, Heineken, Volvo and other major brands among its customers.

Sysomos CEO Lindsay Sparks, who took the job after the company's split from Marketwire, told me that the company plans to integrate Expion's services into the overall Sysomos platform. He argues that most brands today still use a variety of different services to learn about their customers and interact with them on social media. With the Expion acquisition, Sysomos plans to give its users a full-service solution that can make the analytics it generates actionable -- and allows its users to take action right on its platform.



The core of Expion's platform doesn't look all that different from a service like Hootsuite combined with a platform like Percolate. Sysomos bets that it can combine these with its own data analytics product to create a more attractive platform for brands.

contentmarketing3.23

When Spark talked to Sysomos' customers after he became CEO, the overall opinion was that the social media analytics space showed a lot of promise but hadn't been fully realized yet. "Today, you have data and listening and monitoring and community," he said. "But you have to tie them together to create a real end-to-end value proposition." Until now, Sysomos mostly focused on the data analysis side of the business, but its publishing features were rudimentary at best.

Expion currently has about 125 customers. While that's not a huge number, virtually all of them are major enterprises. Sysomos itself has closer to 1,500 companies with a total of 15,000 marketers on its platform.



Sparks tells me that Sysomos was also interested in Expion because of that company's international footprint. The company has offices in Singapore and Shanghai and Sysomos is looking at Asia as a focus area for its international expansion. Expion also offers deep integrations with Chinese platforms WeChat and Weibo.



Sysomos pulls in massive amounts of data from Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and other networks (Spark noted that video and photo content also now represents an ever growing percentage of the data it is looking at). To do this, it has built its own infrastructure, which Expion's customers will also soon get to benefit from (Sysomos is one of the few companies with access to Twitter's firehose feed).





As Sparks stressed, Sysomos is a data science company at its core. He plans to capitalize on the company's head start in this area and double its headcount by the end of the year (to about 500).


Admin · 42 vistas · Escribir un comentario
Jul222015

Site Technology





We have a few fundamental principles: » We don't ask you for personal information unless we truly need it. » We don't share your personal information with anyone except to comply with the law, develop our products and services, promote our website or protect our rights.

» We don't store personal information on our servers unless required for the on-going operation of one of our services. Website Visitors Like most website operators, We collect non-personally-identifying information of the sort that web browsers and servers typically make available, such as the browser type, language preference, referring site, and the date and time of each visitor request. Our purpose in collecting non-personally identifying information is to better understand how visitors use our website. From time to time.Automattic also collects potentially personally-identifying information like Internet Protocol (IP) addresses for logged in users and for users leaving comments on our website. We have a few fundamental principles: » We don't ask you for personal information unless we truly need it. » We don't share your personal information with anyone except to comply with the law, develop our products and services, promote our website or protect our rights. » We don't store personal information on our servers unless required for the on-going operation of one of our services. Website Visitors Like most website operators, We collect non-personally-identifying information of the sort that web browsers and servers typically make available, such as the browser type, language preference, referring site, and the date and time of each visitor request. Our purpose in collecting non-personally identifying information is to better understand how visitors use our website. From time to time.Automattic also collects potentially personally-identifying information like Internet Protocol (IP) addresses for logged in users and for users leaving comments on our website. We have a few fundamental principles: » We don't ask you for personal information unless we truly need it. » We don't share your personal information with anyone except to comply with the law, develop our products and services, promote our website or protect our rights. » We don't store personal information on our servers unless required for the on-going operation of one of our services. Website Visitors Like most website operators, We collect non-personally-identifying information of the sort that web browsers and servers typically make available, such as the browser type, language preference, referring site, and the date and time of each visitor request. Our purpose in collecting non-personally identifying information is to better understand how visitors use our website. From time to Technology Website time.Automattic also collects potentially personally-identifying information like Internet Protocol (IP) addresses for logged in users and for users leaving comments on our website. We have a few fundamental principles: » We don't ask you Technology Website for personal information unless we truly need it. » We don't share your personal information with anyone except to comply with the law, develop our products and services, promote our website or protect our rights. » We don't store personal information on our servers unless required for the on-going operation of Technology Website one of our services. Website Visitors Like most website operators, We collect non-personally-identifying information of the sort that web browsers and servers typically make available, such as the browser type, language preference, referring site, and the date and time of each visitor request. Our purpose in collecting non-personally identifying information is to better understand how visitors use our website. From time to time.Automattic also collects potentially personally-identifying information like Internet Protocol (IP) addresses for logged in users and for users leaving comments on our website.












Admin · 50 vistas · Escribir un comentario

Página precedente   ... 23 ... 42, 43, , 44 ... 50 ... 58  Página siguiente